MTC

Applied Materials

Innovating Toward our Next Great Industry

Yesterday, from the White House, Vice President Biden released a new report, “The Recovery Act: Transforming the American Economy through Innovation,” which outlines how the administration’s $100 billion investment in innovation has been, for the most part, money well spent. In his remarks, Biden highlighted four key areas where stimulus money was working: •Modernizing transportation •Jumpstarting the renewable energy sector •Investing in groundbreaking medical research •Building a platform that will enhance the private sector’s
Applied Materials

President Obama Lends Support for Extending MTC Program

On Friday, President Obama called on Congress to extend the popular clean energy manufacturing tax credit (MTC) [Section 48C] program by approving an additional $5 billion in investment. This would more than double the $2.3 billion that Congress authorized last year as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). An investment of this size would create upwards of 40,000 jobs and generate more than $12 billion in private sector investment, which would lead to an additional 90,000 jobs, according to the president.
Senator Michael Bennet Visits Applied

Senator Michael Bennet Visits Applied

Earlier this month, Applied Materials CEO and Chairman Mike Splinter (far left) led United States Senator for Colorado Michael Bennet (second from left) among others on a tour that included the company's solar operations as well as its 2MW solar array and R&D solar installation.
America Needs to COMPETE

America Needs to COMPETE

Although America once led the global race in clean tech innovation and investment, our country has been slipping behind the rest of the world for quite some time. Last year, China surpassed the U.S. in clean energy investment by an almost two-to-one margin, according to a recent report from The Pew Charitable Trusts. The other “Rising Tigers” in Asia are also nipping at our heels. Over the next five years, these countries will out-invest the U.S. in energy technology by at least three-to-one. That’s a scary prospect.