federal energy policy

Cleantech, Jobs and Silicon Valley

Cleantech, Jobs and Silicon Valley

 One of the things I learned last week was that an event that combines cleantech, jobs and great food—along with effective advertising—can deliver an excellent turnout. Indeed that formula worked at the recent Cleantech Outlook:Growing Green Jobs panel. The event, moderated by Rex Northen, executive director of Cleantech Open, was co-sponsored by the Santa Clara University Leavey School of Business, Applied Materials, and PayPal, which hosted the venue.
The White House is Stepping Out...

The White House is Stepping Out...

Earlier today, Secretary Chu announced on the Department of Energy's Energy Blog that "by the end of this spring, there will be solar panels and a solar hot water heater on the roof of the White House".  Of course, we are all familiar with the infamous removal of the last solar water heater by then-President Reagan after it had been installed by President Carter 31 years ago.  
The U.S. is About to Get Smoked

The U.S. is About to Get Smoked

California will miss its 20% RPS target in 2010, and the very issues that caused the state to miss its 2010 goal will persist as we slog toward a 33% RPS goal by 2020. So say some folks that ought to know. Last night, Climate One and the Commonweatlh Club of California hosted a roundtable with four highly successful professionals, each dedicated to achieving California’s aggressive RPS goals while also establishing a robust clean tech industry that creates and keeps jobs in the state of California. On stage was (L to R) a pro-renewable chairman of the California Public Utility Commission, Mike Peevey, an executive from a progressive utility, Nancy McFadden of PG&E, a CEO from the #1 solar capital equipment company, Mike Splinter of Applied Materials, a practical environmentalist, Bob Epstein of Environmental Entrepreneurs, and, no, that’s not an oxymoron, as well as moderator, Greg Dalton founder of Climate One.