Applied Materials Named to InformationWeek 500 List of Business Innovators

Applied Materials Named to InformationWeek 500 List of Business Innovators

It gives me great pleasure to share that Applied Materials has once again been named to the InformationWeek 500 list of business technology innovators for delivering a customized, highly searchable knowledge management portal for Applied field service engineers.The prestigious list is published annually by InformationWeek and this year’s list spotlights how mobile devices, cloud computing and big data analytics are changing the landscape for IT organizations. Not only is the IT organization now responsible for just tech support–it is also a strategic partner embedded into business products and services.The Applied Rapid Knowledge (ARK) portal was recognized for increasing work efficiency and stream-lining product-related document searches, enabling field service engineers to better support customer equipment.
Applied Materials Collaborates with Taiwan Universities and Research Institute

Applied Materials Collaborates with Taiwan Universities and Research Institute

(Right to Left) Dr. John Chen, vice president and director, Display Technology Center, ITRI; Dr. CC Ho, vice president, NCKU; Dr. HP Shieh, vice president, NCTU; Mike Splinter, chairman and CEO, Applied Material; Dr. ST Lee, president, NTU; Dr. Felix Gwo, vice president, R&D office, NTHU and Erix Yu, vice president and Taiwan country general manager, Applied Materials.In a ceremony this week, Applied Materials signed a Memorandum of Understandings (MOU) with each of the four leading Taiwanese universities and Taiwan’s Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) all in an effort to promote increased collaboration between industry and academia. In addition to accelerating technology innovation, the MOUs are expected to expand Taiwan’s talent pool by helping to prepare students for the high-tech challenges of the future.The parties involved in the MOUs with Applied are the National Taiwan University (NTU), National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), National Tsing Hua University (NTHU), National Cheng Kung University (NCKU) and ITRI’s Display Technology Center.
Printing Solar Profitability

Printing Solar Profitability

Solar installations are rocketing worldwide as solar electricity becomes cheaper than electricity from fossil fuels – it’s already happened in 105 countries. This is the tipping point where economics takes over from altruism and solar PV becomes a serious part of the global energy mix.The steady drop in cost-per-watt is great news for the end user and is enabled by simultaneous increases in cell efficiency and lower manufacturing costs.If you’re a cell manufacturer, though, dropping prices are a double-edged sword: strong demand is good, but you must continuously lower costs by improving your manufacturing processes in order to be profitable.So, in a fiercely competitive industry, how is this done?After the jump, we’ll look at a great example of how cell manufacturers can boost profitability using an emerging technique called “double printing”.
Metal Oxide TFTs – Closer to Realization

Metal Oxide TFTs – Closer to Realization

In recent years we have seen flat screen TVs growing bigger and bigger and their capabilities continuously improved. Full high definition (HD) screen resolutions of (1920x1080 pixels) are now standard with many panel makers showcasing or announcing larger ultra-definition resolution screens. At the same time refresh rates are increasing, providing a better appearance of moving images and 3D TV.Consumers today can choose from a large variety of huge screens providing extremely crisp and detailed images at very high refresh rates. Most recently, large OLED TVs have started to reach the market. However, fabricating these high-performance displays represent a big challenge to the panel makers since they need to figure out a way to drive all these pixels integrated on very large areas with sufficient speed and low power consumption.
The Rolling Stones of Chipmaking: Still Cranking Out the Goodies

The Rolling Stones of Chipmaking: Still Cranking Out the Goodies

In 1993, when the internet was mostly a science experiment, Applied shipped a new P5000 CVD system to the Motorola SPS (now Freescale) Oak Hill fab in Austin, Texas -- where it was used to produce processors for Apple computers. A year later, Motorola installed its second P5000 system. Fast forward 20 years and you’ll find both tools on the production line and still running!Together, the two P5000s have processed an astounding 4.4 million wafers -- or over a billion chips. Continually modified and upgraded over the years with new hardware and software improvements through the Applied Global Services (AGS) organization, these two tools have gallantly served a number of technology nodes and applications at Freescale.
Applied Materials Supports Second Harvest Food Bank’s Expansion

Applied Materials Supports Second Harvest Food Bank’s Expansion

I really enjoyed being involved in yesterday’s opening of Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties’ new facility in San Jose, CA. It is an impressive building that provides 75,000 more square feet of operating space, greatly increases the Food Bank’s capacity to involve volunteers in meeting the needs of our community, and enables an amazing 50% of distributed items to be nutritious, fresh produce!Applied Materials has a long history partnering with Second Harvest and was pleased to join other corporate funders including Cypress Semiconductor, Cisco Systems, and SanDisk as well as numerous individuals and families to support the Food Bank's expansion. For many of us, tackling food insecurity issues in our local communities is a high priority and honored tradition we address through corporate contributions and employee volunteerism. Check out coverage in the San Jose Mercury News.
Applied Materials

Celebrating Ten Years of Empowering Social Entrepreneurs

Santa Clara University’s Center for Science, Technology and Society (CSTS) recently celebrated the 10th anniversary of its signature program, the Global Social Benefit Incubator (GSBI) by doing what it always has - pairing up to 20 of the most promising social entrepreneurs with experienced Silicon Valley business mentors for months of learning and networking—capped off with a two-week stint of classes at Santa Clara University (SCU), and a grand-finale summit at which they presented their business plans to Silicon Valley financiers, executives and others.Addressing ‘the gap between good intentions and skilled execution’ successfully has been a hallmark of GSBI since its inception, and Applied Materials is proud to have been involved in various ways with this exceptional program year after year.The program has had notable successes throughout the developing world —helping to transform social ventures like micro-lender, Kiva; Indian rural electrification pioneer, Husk Power Systems; and optical health leader, VisionSpring, to name just a few of the nearly 200 startups that have successfully completed the rigorous 10-month process.
Applied Materials

Making an Impact in Education

I recently attended a breakfast meeting hosted by Deloitte designed to build awareness for City Year and the powerful work that nonprofit is doing in Silicon Valley’s education system. The Applied Materials Foundation has been a longtime partner of City Year, so this meeting held special significance to me. Additionally, Dr. Tom Green, the Director of School Transformation for one of our school district partners, the Alum Rock Union Elementary School District, was featured as the keynote speaker. Tom captured the essence of the challenges facing public schools and the social contract that now mandates the moral imperative with which schools operate. It was fascinating learning for me and made me proud that the Applied Materials Foundation has chosen to concentrate its philanthropy into closing the achievement gap in the most underserved areas of our community, such as Alum Rock.
Novel Zero-Power Display Technology from Halation Photonics

Novel Zero-Power Display Technology from Halation Photonics

Picture a future where your bathroom mirror doubles as an information resource, displaying the weather forecast and your daily agenda, and where your vision is precisely enhanced by tunable eyeglasses and windshields. This is a future that Halation Photonics aims to enable. Applied Ventures is proud to join Halation as an investor.The majority of mobile devices today use LCD screens. While these displays are certainly a technical marvel, next generation devices will demand higher efficiency displays that consume significantly less power.Unlike traditional displays that require a backlight and a constant power source, Halation’s multi-stable liquid crystal displays do not require any power to hold an image. In this video, Dan Sun, Halation’s chairman and CTO, explains Halation’s innovative technology and some of its applications.More on Halation's technology after the jump.