Kerry Cunningham

Kerry has been in the Display marketing group for 10 years and is in charge of Display product sales for North America and Europe. Kerry also supports Display marketing communications activities from Santa Clara, California.
LCDs, Aperture Ratios and Hummingbirds

LCDs, Aperture Ratios and Hummingbirds

Why is a smartphone like a hummingbird? Neither can go more than a few hours without refueling, or bad things happen. (If you answered that smartphone owners are often forced to flutter around looking for a power outlet, I’ll accept that, too.)Do you know where the power goes? As the graphic shows, around half your battery is spent on the display alone. And of that, the vast majority is used simply to power the backlight that all LCDs need. (The situation for AMOLED displays is similar, but for different reasons. That’s a subject for a future blog.)Clearly, improving the power efficiency of the display is a powerful way to improve battery life. Turning the brightness down isn’t a helpful strategy. Indeed, we expect displays to be brighter and richer all the time, but not at the expense of already limited battery life. (Bigger batteries would also work, but the market has spoken on that one. Slim is in!)How is this to be accomplished? Find out after the jump.
Witnessing a walk on the moon: Too bad we didn’t have 3D TVs!

Witnessing a walk on the moon: Too bad we didn’t have 3D TVs!

With 15 years of experience in the Display industry at Applied Materials, I have witnessed firsthand the dynamic advances that have taken place in display technologies.  But as remarkable as these advances have been; the excitement and promise of displays are their ability to allow for the interaction of the shared human experience.Last Friday marked one of the great anniversaries in the history of live broadcast television, so I thought I’d take this opportunity to reflect on this moment in time and briefly describe the giant leaps made in display technology over the last 40 years.
Cutting-Edge LCDs: Your Metal Oxide Questions Answered [Updated]

Cutting-Edge LCDs: Your Metal Oxide Questions Answered [Updated]

[Updated February 13, 2013 because metal oxide backplane technology has improved since the original post was published. See question 7.]There has been a huge amount of interest and discussion around new LCD backplane technologies, particularly about metal oxide. Following on from my first post on the subject last week, I thought it might be useful to answers some of the questions I’ve been hearing most often.1. Amorphous Silicon (a-Si) has been the dominant transistor backplane technology for displays the last 20 years. Why are new technologies necessary?Changes are being driven primarily by the demand for higher resolution and faster refresh rates. The most important transistor parameter is electron mobility. Electron mobility of a-Si is very low (around 1cm2/Vs) and is at the edge of the physical ability to support high refresh rates such as 240Hz for high definition television. (Just in case you need a reminder, as this graphic shows, each transistor is basically an on/off switch that controls each red/green/blue subpixel and 240Hz refers to 240 switches per second.)
Cutting-Edge LCDs: What You Need to Know

Cutting-Edge LCDs: What You Need to Know

The display industry is in the middle of one of the most significant technical transitions of the last 20 years and it is also mostly invisible to the average consumer. It has all to do with the advances taking place in transistors – the electronic switches that control the display’s picture, providing clarity and crisp imagery.Every pixel on your LCD screen is turned on or off by a transistor. The complete array of pixel transistors is known as a backplane, as you can see in the graphic. Clearly, the performance of the backplane directly affects the quality of the display for your TV, smartphones and tablet PCs. How fast the switch can be turned on and off refers to the refresh rate and the total number of pixels on the screen equals picture resolution. Today, there are three backplane technologies, which we call amorphous silicon (a-si), low temperature poly-silicon (LTPS) and metal oxide (MO). If you are buying a TV, should you care what transistor technology is in it?
Applied Materials

CES 2012: 4K, Ultrabooks and Ice Cream Sandwich

The 2012 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) as usual was crazy big, and with a few key exceptions (Apple comes to mind; everyone flocked to Las Vegas to demonstrate the latest gadgets and gizmos including, the latest display products. These included mobile devices - both smart phones and tablet PCs; notebook computers and TVs.The goal of this post is to help you better understand industry terminology and highlight the latest products at this year’s CES enabled by Applied’s display technology.
Future Displays are Smart and Touchable

Future Displays are Smart and Touchable

Left to Right: Appliance with Veneer glass; 75” Smart 3-D TV by Samsung; AUO’s 32” Metal Oxide TFT OLED;  85” 8K4K Super Hi Vision by Sharp.At this year’s FPD International show the displays on exhibit were larger, thinner, of higher resolution, smarter, touchable and energy efficient. In this blog post I’ll attempt to give you a glimpse into the latest and greatest display technology I saw on exhibit at the show.
Applied Materials

Applied Materials Has the Touch at FPD Int’l

At the FPD International 2011 show touchpanel applications were everywhere. While the focus was on mobility devices such as smartphones and tablet PC’s; evidence was everywhere that touch is moving to larger applications soon, such as interactive “smart” TV and even a new cool app called “appliance veneer glass” — I’ll describe this in more detail in an upcoming blog post. All of the exhibitors with new mobility device displays touted high resolution and low power consumption as key features.
It's an Interactive Visual World at FPD International

It's an Interactive Visual World at FPD International

Applied Materials’ is at FPD International in Yokohama, Japan this week from October 26-28, presenting the theme “Enabling an Interactive Visual World.” Prominently featured at this year’s show is the AKT-20KPX PECVD system for high mobility backplanes driving smartphones and tablet PC’s and the Aristo Twin PVD for touch panel applications.