Solar

Applied Materials Recognized for Leading Green Power Use by EPA

Applied Materials Recognized for Leading Green Power Use by EPA

Applied Materials is pleased to be recognized once again for our commitment to green energy. In the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Green Power Partnership report released this week, Applied ranked No. 82 on National Top 100 list of the largest green power users, No. 13 on the list of Top 30 Tech & Telecom companies and No. 26 on the FORTUNE 500 list.
Innovating While Retrofitting

Innovating While Retrofitting

Team UOW – from the University of Wollongong in Australia – took first place at the Solar Decathlon China!  Not only did their entry score the highest points in the competition but it received recognition as the oldest house in the event.  The Team avoided the environmental impacts of new construction by retrofitting a typical existing Australian home built in the period of the 1950’s and 60’s.
Innovation Shines at China and U.S. Solar Decathlons

Innovation Shines at China and U.S. Solar Decathlons

The wait is over as 20 student teams from 35 universities across 13 countries on six continents have officially arrived in Datong, China for the first-ever Solar Decathlon held in Asia.  The China Solar Decathlon runs from August 2-11 and challenges college teams to complete against one-another to design and build an energy-efficient home that is attractive, affordable and ready for occupancy.
PV Roadmap: Moving Target but Critical Compass for Industry

PV Roadmap: Moving Target but Critical Compass for Industry

Applied Materials invited me to write a blog post about SEMI’s recently released the 4th edition of the ITRPV, the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics to highlight the importance of establishing an industry direction for R&D and planning. The ITRPV outlines expected technology developments and helps set a basis for dialog about required improvements and standards. The ITRPV effort began in 2008 in Europe and was the first SEMI effort to bring the photovoltaic (PV) industry together around shared challenges and a consensus outlook on where Crystalline-silicon (c-Si) is going.
Making Connections to Improve Lives

Making Connections to Improve Lives

The energy was obvious and the connections were working on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day at the Tech Museum in San Jose, CA … both as 40 students worked in teams to build “We Share Solar Suitcases” and when the switch was flipped on their creations to generate electricity to power a 100-watt light bulb.  Best yet, the students knew that the suitcase they engineered would power the first lights for schools and orphanages in Africa.
Applied Materials

The Collaborative Economy and the Planet

Can sharing goods and services help save the planet?  That was one of a number of provocative questions posed by Van Jones in a Master class offered by the Presidio Graduate School.  You may recall Jones as the passionate human rights and green jobs proponent who served briefly in the Obama Administration.  The problem statement with which he launched the class was that consumerism is threatening the planet’s future as we extract more and more resources and throw away more and more things, i.e. waste.  Collaborative economics was described as a “nation of neighbors”, where we share with one another and rely more on our social capital than strictly upon financial capital.  Jones capsulized it as follows:  “do we want to treat our planet as if we are locusts (consuming the planet) or as honeybees (living, building and producing together)?”Sharing can be part of the solution to the ecological problems that come from excess consumerism.
Printing Solar Profitability

Printing Solar Profitability

Solar installations are rocketing worldwide as solar electricity becomes cheaper than electricity from fossil fuels – it’s already happened in 105 countries. This is the tipping point where economics takes over from altruism and solar PV becomes a serious part of the global energy mix.The steady drop in cost-per-watt is great news for the end user and is enabled by simultaneous increases in cell efficiency and lower manufacturing costs.If you’re a cell manufacturer, though, dropping prices are a double-edged sword: strong demand is good, but you must continuously lower costs by improving your manufacturing processes in order to be profitable.So, in a fiercely competitive industry, how is this done?After the jump, we’ll look at a great example of how cell manufacturers can boost profitability using an emerging technique called “double printing”.