smartphones

Enabling Ultra-High Resolution, Low Power Displays

Enabling Ultra-High Resolution, Low Power Displays

Display devices that require higher resolution are typically greater than 300 pixels-per-inch and call for a change at the transistor level to a higher mobility material. Click here to learn more about current smartphone resolution and where it's headed. In order to accommodate more pixels for higher resolution, traditional amorphous silicon (a-Si)-based transistors can be made smaller but have to compensate by using more power to maintain picture quality ultimately leaving less power dedicated to battery life. I can't think of anyone on the planet who wants to sacrifice battery life. Fortunately, we have a solution! Metal oxide (MoX) and low temperature polysilicon (LTPS) -based transistors can scale down the transistor size using low power while meeting the higher mobility requirements that consumers demand in the latest mobility gadgets.
Creating a New Global Innovator

Creating a New Global Innovator

Today, Applied Materials, Inc., and Tokyo Electron, Ltd., announced exciting news – we are combining our companies to form a new global innovator in the semiconductor and display equipment industries. We are bringing together our complementary strengths to create an expanded set of capabilities in precision materials engineering and patterning that are strategically important for customers.
The Evolution of the Cell Phone: A 40 Year Retrospective

The Evolution of the Cell Phone: A 40 Year Retrospective

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the first cell phone call, and one would be hard pressed to think of a more ubiquitous high tech device. Market research firm mobiThinking puts the total number of worldwide cell phone subscribers in 2012 at more than 6.8 billion. That’s equivalent to about 96 percent of the world’s population!How did the cell phone become the most widely used communication technology in human history? A major factor is the ongoing advancement of high-performance, low-power semiconductor components. These advancements improve battery life and enable the continuous addition of new features and functionality that make today’s smartphones a reality. Taking this one step further, the advancements in semiconductor technology are largely the result of work by thousands of engineers and scientists to push the limits of the physical and material sciences.
Applied Materials

Applied Materials Has the Touch at FPD Int’l

At the FPD International 2011 show touchpanel applications were everywhere. While the focus was on mobility devices such as smartphones and tablet PC’s; evidence was everywhere that touch is moving to larger applications soon, such as interactive “smart” TV and even a new cool app called “appliance veneer glass” — I’ll describe this in more detail in an upcoming blog post. All of the exhibitors with new mobility device displays touted high resolution and low power consumption as key features.
Celebrating the Birth of the Internet

Celebrating the Birth of the Internet

These days, staying connected to the ones you love or work with is as easy as the touch of a button and the swipe of your finger.  It’s hard to image a time without cell phones, without Wi-Fi or god forbid Facebook, let alone the internet all together.  Today we have more than 5 billion internet-connected devices, with an expected 22 billion by 2020. And we owe it in part to the ingenuity of two young academics at UCLA and Stanford Research Institute (SRI) who back in 1969 connected two computers for the first time, sparking what would lead to today’s age of connectivity as we now know it and changing the way we live and play.
Applied Materials

OLED Displays: Why All The Fuss?

Active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays have been available on high-end smartphones for a while now, and there has been a lot of speculation about when we’ll start to see tablet devices equipped the same screen technology. I would like to take a closer look at why AMOLED technology is so hotly anticipated.OLED displays use an alternative pixel-lighting mechanism compared to liquid crystal display (LCD) - a mechanism that is simpler in concept and offers advantages over LCD, but introduces numerous technological challenges that display manufacturers are working to overcome.
Feeding a Touch-Panel Hungry World

Feeding a Touch-Panel Hungry World

Just this year, we have seen a virtual explosion of touch panel growth fueled by the world’s seemingly insatiable appetite for touch-enabled devices. It is hard to say whether this growth will be tempered or continue amidst the promise of even greater adoption of mobility devices and invention of new “must have” products. In either case, touch technology is now a permanent member of the flat panel display family.I marvel at how the industry has evolved over the past few years. Three years ago, I had the opportunity to take a position as Head of our Web Products Group in Germany (the group that makes our roll-to-roll vacuum deposition tools). At that time we strengthened our focus on Flexible Electronics, looking at opportunities in flexible solar, displays, printed circuit boards and several different transparent conductor-based applications including touch screen elements. Ironically, the team had already been addressing this market for years, with sales of roll-to-roll sputtering tools for indium tin oxide (ITO) since the early 1980s, but it had remained relatively small and stable due to modest annual growth in resistive touch technology.
Companies Focus On Sharpening Tablet Screens

Companies Focus On Sharpening Tablet Screens

Dow Jones recently reported on the future of tablet and smartphone displays. As the leading equipment supplier to the display industry, Applied Materials was called on to lend comment to the trends and technologies that will be driving the industry in the coming years.