RPS

Applied Materials

Clean Tech Victory for California’s RPS!

California celebrated a major clean energy milestone yesterday as Governor Brown signed into law a bill that will significantly diversify the state’s energy portfolio. The enacted legislation, which was authored by state Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto, will increase the state’s renewable portfolio standard (RPS) to 33% by 2020 (up from the pre-existing RPS of 20%). This new law is a giant leap forward and sends an encouraging message to the venture capital community that the state remains committed to developing a vibrant renewable energy and clean technology sector.
Strongest Renewable Standard Bill Sent to the Governor

Strongest Renewable Standard Bill Sent to the Governor

California's pioneering 33% Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) bill, authored by state Sen. Joe Simitian, D-Palo Alto, passed the California Assembly yesterday, sending a measure to Governor Brown’s desk – which he is expected to sign. The new standard will increase the state’s renewable portfolio standard to 33% by 2020.
Cleantech, Jobs and Silicon Valley

Cleantech, Jobs and Silicon Valley

 One of the things I learned last week was that an event that combines cleantech, jobs and great food—along with effective advertising—can deliver an excellent turnout. Indeed that formula worked at the recent Cleantech Outlook:Growing Green Jobs panel. The event, moderated by Rex Northen, executive director of Cleantech Open, was co-sponsored by the Santa Clara University Leavey School of Business, Applied Materials, and PayPal, which hosted the venue.
Applied Materials

Reaching Our Renewable Energy Goals

Last week, the Senate unfortunately failed to act on Senate Bill 3663 – a comprehensive energy reform bill before the August recess. In light of this disappointing delay, it is now more necessary than ever to focus our efforts to develop, and successfully implement, clean energy legislation at the state level. While some question the value of investments in a green-collar industry, many law makers, as well as individuals and companies, are pushing for stronger development of this sector.
The U.S. is About to Get Smoked

The U.S. is About to Get Smoked

California will miss its 20% RPS target in 2010, and the very issues that caused the state to miss its 2010 goal will persist as we slog toward a 33% RPS goal by 2020. So say some folks that ought to know. Last night, Climate One and the Commonweatlh Club of California hosted a roundtable with four highly successful professionals, each dedicated to achieving California’s aggressive RPS goals while also establishing a robust clean tech industry that creates and keeps jobs in the state of California. On stage was (L to R) a pro-renewable chairman of the California Public Utility Commission, Mike Peevey, an executive from a progressive utility, Nancy McFadden of PG&E, a CEO from the #1 solar capital equipment company, Mike Splinter of Applied Materials, a practical environmentalist, Bob Epstein of Environmental Entrepreneurs, and, no, that’s not an oxymoron, as well as moderator, Greg Dalton founder of Climate One.
Santa Baby

Santa Baby

Santa baby, slip solar panels under the tree, for meBeen an awesome green girlSanta baby, so hurry down the chimney tonightSanta honey, an energy bill too, come true
Applied Materials

How a Feed-in Tariff Can Help Solve California’s Renewables Problem

Today, the solar photovoltaics (PV) industry relies on government incentive programs to be competitive in electricity markets. The main government policy lever has been the use of feed-in tariffs (FiTs). An FiT requires utilities to interconnect with private renewable energy generators and purchase the electricity generated at a pre-determined rate.
Applied Materials

A Powerful Economic Engine Fueled by the Sun

MANUFACTURE AND GENERATE CLEAN ENERGY LOCALLY. RECIRCULATE YOUR ENERGY DOLLARS LOCALLY. It’s a concept that’s pretty hard to argue. Most recognize that taking advantage of the Sun's energy addresses greenhouse gas emissions, but this post isn’t aimed at making more sweeping claims that solar will save the planet. Rather, what’s often overlooked is that manufacturing clean energy locally yields economic benefits to the community.