research

Game Changers: Energy Science, Innovation and the Future of America

Game Changers: Energy Science, Innovation and the Future of America

What does it really mean to change the game in energy technologies? Not to change a single game  – as with a last-second shot at the buzzer, a Hail Mary pass, or a diving catch to close out the inning – but to transform the entire game, with new rules, new technologies, and often-unexpected new results.In the National Laboratory system, we are working on new energy technologies that could transform the ways we generate, store and use energy, and that could protect our environment while recharging our national economy. But as we tackle the fundamental scientific research we need to discover and develop disruptive new energy technologies, it’s worthwhile to ask: What does game-changing technology look like, and what are currently our best prospects for game changers? 
Applied Materials Collaborates with Taiwan Universities and Research Institute

Applied Materials Collaborates with Taiwan Universities and Research Institute

(Right to Left) Dr. John Chen, vice president and director, Display Technology Center, ITRI; Dr. CC Ho, vice president, NCKU; Dr. HP Shieh, vice president, NCTU; Mike Splinter, chairman and CEO, Applied Material; Dr. ST Lee, president, NTU; Dr. Felix Gwo, vice president, R&D office, NTHU and Erix Yu, vice president and Taiwan country general manager, Applied Materials.In a ceremony this week, Applied Materials signed a Memorandum of Understandings (MOU) with each of the four leading Taiwanese universities and Taiwan’s Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) all in an effort to promote increased collaboration between industry and academia. In addition to accelerating technology innovation, the MOUs are expected to expand Taiwan’s talent pool by helping to prepare students for the high-tech challenges of the future.The parties involved in the MOUs with Applied are the National Taiwan University (NTU), National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), National Tsing Hua University (NTHU), National Cheng Kung University (NCKU) and ITRI’s Display Technology Center.
Driving R&D to a Full Charge at Applied Materials

Driving R&D to a Full Charge at Applied Materials

The Department of Energy’s Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) announced today that it has awarded Applied Materials a $5 million research grant for the development of advanced cells for electric drive vehicle batteries over the next three years. The accepted proposal for 'Modular Process Equipment for Low Cost Manufacturing of High Capacity Prismatic Li-Ion Cell' Alloy Anodes aims to develop a new class of high-capacity lithium battery anodes based on an innovative micro-cell porous 3D Cu – Li alloy structure. The technology holds great potential to enable the development of advanced manufacturing prototype modules for fabricating high-capacity Li-ion electrodes in large quantities at a lower cost for vehicle lithium ion batteries.
Applied Materials

Applied´s Innovation Engine

Innovation is the heart of Applied Materials.  One way to gauge the strength of our innovation engine is by looking at the number of new patents that we receive each year.  According to data compiled by IFI Claims Patent Services, a division of Fairview Research LLC that analyzes patent data, Applied was one of America's top patent recipients.  Applied was among an elite group of companies including Intel Corp., Cisco Systems Inc., Oracle Corp.
New Collaboration for Energy Research

New Collaboration for Energy Research

I am pleased to share that Applied Materials has joined the Energy Research Initiative (ERI), a collaboration created by the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) to promote research at leading universities for reliable, affordable, energy-efficient systems.The ERI is a program designed to create an industry-university partnership to support the development of improved photovoltaic devices, and enable an efficient and reliable smart grid electricity infrastructure with renewable energy resources.