NAND Flash

3D NAND - On its Way

3D NAND - On its Way

The past several weeks have been big for 3D NAND flash technology.Samsung announced it had begun mass production of its first 3D vertical NAND flash memory, a 128GB chip using 24 cell layers. Following this news, at the Flash Memory Summit, Samsung Executive Vice President and General Manager E.S. Jung delivered  a special keynote address,  titled ”Ushering in the 3D Memory Era with Vertical NAND.”  In his talk, he told the audience that Samsung’s implementation of 3D NAND was delivering impressive performance benefits over its previous 19nm planar NAND:  2 times higher density, 2 times faster write speed, 50 percent less power consumption and 10 times better endurance.
Applied Materials

What is Going on with Sub-20nm Flash?

This week I’ll be participating in a panel discussion at the Flash Memory Summit in Santa Clara, CA. The panel’s topic, Flash Below 20nm: What is Coming and When?, couldn’t be more timely. Particularly in light of a leading NAND manufacturer’s recent announcement that they will begin mass production of the semiconductor industry’s first 3D vertical NAND flash memory later this year.3D NAND presents some significant changes to the traditional semiconductor manufacturing model.
Applied Materials

3D NAND: The Future of Flash

With the 5th Annual International Memory Workshop (IMW) coming up next week in Monterey, CA I wanted to point out a recent article from Semiconductor Manufacturing & Design.  As the cell-to-cell interference issues characteristic of sub-20nm manufacturing processes threaten to keep NAND from moving to smaller nodes, the major players in the NAND flash market are looking at different approaches to implementing NAND in a 3D chip architecture. The article provides a great summary of the different approaches to 3D NAND customers are adopting and when to expect those technologies to hit the market.
Helping Flash Memory Grow Up: Etch Technology for the Terabit Era

Helping Flash Memory Grow Up: Etch Technology for the Terabit Era

It might be the understatement of the year to say that Flash memory is popular. Every year, we consume nearly twice as many bits as the year before.Consider these nuggets: Today’s smart phones have more Flash memory than a desktop computer’s hard drive from the mid-1990s. Even budget phones can capture high-definition (HD) video and share it on the web. Flash-based solid state drives have moved from exotic to commonplace in just the last couple of years.This has been made possible by a precipitous fall in the cost-per-bit. Every five years, the cost falls by an order of magnitude. How do memory makers cope with this treadmill?
New Memories Take Center Stage

New Memories Take Center Stage

In the same way that various prophets of doom foretell the imminent demise of Moore’s Law, we often hear that conventional memory technologies are going to run out of steam soon. However, the semiconductor industry is highly-skilled at extending its existing architectures rather than making the leap to shiny new ones with apparently compelling advantages. Thus, incremental advances in conventional technology have delayed the introduction of a raft of exciting new memory technologies. When will the tipping point be reached that pushes one or more into the mainstream? Read what the some of the best-informed minds in the business have to say after the jump. 
3D Chip Technology for Dummies

3D Chip Technology for Dummies

It's not just movies, televisions and video games that are going three-dimensional these days. Microchips are doing it, too.Semiconductors aren't shifting into the third dimension because it’s fashionable, though. This shift is about continuing Moore’s Law, the relentless drive for higher performance that has driven the industry for four decades.With three very different types of 3D construction in development today, it can be a confusing subject. Vertical chip structures, 3D device stacking, 3D chip packaging – what does it all mean?We made this video to help demystify the subject. Did it help? Let me know in the comments below. 
Enabling Future Memory Devices

Enabling Future Memory Devices

As memory scaling proceeds, the industry is evaluating a variety of options for achieving the performance required from sub-2X memory devices.DRAM, Flash, and emerging memory development each face unique complexities and unknowns. What will DRAM technology look like in three to five years? What is the next big growth area for the NAND market? What’s next in emerging memory? Is a universal memory format the next technology?In conjunction with the International Memory Workshop 2011 on May 23 in Monterey, California, Applied Materials will host a panel discussion with distinguished speakers from Hynix, IMEC, Nokia, Samsung, and Toshiba for a thought-provoking and lively conference session discussing these questions and related topics.