Moore's Law

Beyond Von Neumann: Applied Materials and Arm Lead DARPA-Funded Research on a Neuromorphic Switch for AI

Back in July, Applied Materials announced that we’d been selected by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop technology for AI. At the core of this project are the efforts of Applied Materials, Arm and Symetrix to develop a correlated electron switch. This of course begs the question, “what the heck is a correlated electron?”
Industry Leaders Examine Advancing Interconnect Scaling

Industry Leaders Examine Advancing Interconnect Scaling

Applied Materials will host a forum at the IITC* conference in Grenoble, France on May 19 to discuss ways of overcoming critical challenges in copper interconnect scaling. While much of the industry’s focus has been on transistor scaling, at the 10nm node and beyond, the interconnect is becoming a major issue. Applied Materials and guest speakers will explore the path that interconnect technology must take to keep pace with Moore’s Law in a panel titled "Advancing the Frontiers of Interconnect Scaling."
How do Innovations Become Industries?

How do Innovations Become Industries?

 Click on the graphic to expand the image.We’ve all seen it happen many times, especially during major events such as the post-thanksgiving Black Friday, Cyber Monday and holiday sales: gadgets that were expensively priced for early adopters are suddenly affordable and accessible to the average person, which in turn spur a jump in demand. A 55-inch 3D LED TV, for example, that retailed for more than $3000 USD not too long ago now sells for about $1300 (and it comes with a 3D Blu-ray player and 4 sets of 3D glasses!) Similarly, a respectable laptop PC can cost less than $300 USD these days when they were more than $2000 just a couple years back. My 486 desktop computer used to be two grand! Aside from consumer electronics, we’re seeing similar trends of cost reduction in industries such as solar and LED lighting. A photovoltaic (PV) solar module that used to cost more than $5 per watt five years ago now goes for about $1.50 per watt. LED light bulbs for general lighting sold for more than $40 per bulb in hardware stores two years ago now sell for less than $20, and I am sure they will be comparably priced with today’s CFL bulb in the near future.So how do these incredibly technologically advanced products become so affordable? The answer is technology and scale.
IEEE Spectrum Article: Transistor Wars

IEEE Spectrum Article: Transistor Wars

May 4, 2011 may go down in history as a day that shook the chip industry to its core, literally. Anyone even remotely interested in technology must have caught Intel’s dramatic announcement on that day that 3-D transistors are now ready to enter high-volume manufacturing.However, other leading players believe there’s plenty of development room left in two dimensions.