Applied Materials

3D NAND Is a Reality – What’s Next?

One of the biggest developments taking place in the semiconductor industry is the emergence of 3D NAND memory technology. Products are available today that feature 3D NAND devices. It has taken years to become a reality — since Toshiba first discussed the concept of 3D NAND at the VLSI Symposium in 2007 – and now it is poised to replace planar NAND flash memory for storage. The path that has led to this point is similar to what happened with the logic roadmap; despite innovative workarounds, the era of traditional planar "shrinks" for NAND is running out of steam.  And, just as with logic, it has required significant technical advances to overcome the formidable challenges to successfully manufacture complex vertical 3D NAND designs.
Global Innovators Solving Critical Problems

Global Innovators Solving Critical Problems

They bring passion, commitment and technological innovation to the streets of Mexico, the watersheds of India, and low income neighborhoods of Nigeria. They are providing clean drinking water to people living in poverty, educating underserved youth, and offering information to improve livelihoods of low-income farmers.  They are using the power of technology to benefit humanity.They are the ten 2013 Tech Laureates who were honored for creatively addressing some of the world’s most critical problems at the annual Tech Awards a gala event benefiting the Tech Museum of Innovation in Silicon Valley.
Applied Named 2014 Military Friendly Employer

Applied Named 2014 Military Friendly Employer

I'm proud to share that Applied Materials has once again been recognized today for its outstanding support of military veterans and National Guard and Reserve members, and has been designated a 2014 Military Friendly Employer by G.I. Jobs magazine.This marks the eighth consecutive year that the company has been included on the list, which was complied from a data-driven survey of more than 5,000 companies whose annual revenues exceeded $500 million.
Mike Splinter Awarded Semiconductor Industry’s Highest Honor

Mike Splinter Awarded Semiconductor Industry’s Highest Honor

Applied Materials Executive Chairman Mike Splinter was recognized this week at the Semiconductor Industry Association’s (SIA) 36th annual awards dinner, where he received the Robert N. Noyce Award, the industry’s highest honor, for his significant contributions to the U.S. semiconductor industry in technology and public policy.A well-known and respected industry veteran, Mike successfully led Applied Materials as CEO for more than a decade, expanding the company’s position as a leading global equipment provider to the semiconductor, display and solar industries, and helping to drive critical innovations in transistor design to further Moore’s Law, the foundation of all modern day electronics.
Happy Birthday, Internet!

Happy Birthday, Internet!

What’s the population of Singapore? How many species of salmon are there in the world? Who won the gold medal for men’s downhill skiing in the 1994 Olympic Winter Games? Answers to these questions along with an infinite amount of other information are now easily available to a majority of the world’s fingertips thanks to something that happened 44 years ago today. That’s when two computers, one at UCLA and one at the Stanford Research Institute, connected over ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network) to exchange the world’s first “host-to-host” message. This rather inauspicious event is viewed by many as the birth of a technology that became a communication tool now used by billions of people around the world every day. Of course, I’m talking about the Internet.
Clinton Global Initiative: Solving Global Problems through Innovation

Clinton Global Initiative: Solving Global Problems through Innovation

In India, approximately 30% of the country's population - or 300 million people - do not have access to a dependable source of electricity. While solar power can be an excellent solution, barriers still exist for people living in impoverished communities. Most significant are the lack of end-user financing and the absence of reliable service and maintenance of the solar equipment.
Enabling Ultra-High Resolution, Low Power Displays

Enabling Ultra-High Resolution, Low Power Displays

Display devices that require higher resolution are typically greater than 300 pixels-per-inch and call for a change at the transistor level to a higher mobility material. Click here to learn more about current smartphone resolution and where it's headed. In order to accommodate more pixels for higher resolution, traditional amorphous silicon (a-Si)-based transistors can be made smaller but have to compensate by using more power to maintain picture quality ultimately leaving less power dedicated to battery life. I can't think of anyone on the planet who wants to sacrifice battery life. Fortunately, we have a solution! Metal oxide (MoX) and low temperature polysilicon (LTPS) -based transistors can scale down the transistor size using low power while meeting the higher mobility requirements that consumers demand in the latest mobility gadgets.